Publications & Videos

Weed Identification and Control Publications

  • Arrowleaf Sida/Prickly Sida, D51 – Arrowleaf sida, also known as ironweed (not to be confused with tall ironweed) is an erect, summer annual herb. Prickly sida, also an erect, summer annual herb, is more commonly known as false-mallow, Indian mallow, spiny sida or teaweed.
  • Nodding Spurge, D52 – Nodding spurge is an erect, summer annual herb. This native of North America occurs throughout Tennessee; it is a troublesome weed in row and vegetable crops, ornamentals, rights-of-way, pastures and hay fields, and many other situations.
  • Johnsongrass, W117 – Johnsongrass, Sorghum halepense(L.) Pers., is a member of the grass or Poaceae family. Johnsongrass is a very troublesome weed, as it is capable of extensive seed production and can propagate from creeping, thick rhizomes.
  • Horsenettle, W264 – Horsenettle is a native of southeastern North America is found throughout Tennessee; it is particularly troublesome in grass pastures and hay fields. As is the case with most other weeds, prevention is an important component of an overall management plan.
  • Poison Hemlock, W325 – Poison Hemlock, also called deadly hemlock, poison parsley, spotted hemlock, and California fern, is a highly poisonous biennial weed that is a member of the family Apiaceae, which is also referred to as the carrot family.
  • Tumble Mustard, W326 – Tumble mustard, also known as tall hedge mustard, Jim Hill mustard, and tall rocket, is a winter annual or biennial member of the Brassicaceae or mustard family.
  • Tall Ironweed, W307 – Tall ironweed is an erect, warm-season perennial plant that is a member of the sunflower family (Asteraceae). It is native to North America and can be found throughout Tennessee in hay fields, pastures and roadsides, particularly in moist areas.
  • Knotroot Foxtail, W308 – Knotroot foxtail is a warm-season perennial grass that is also known as knotroot bristlegrass or simply perennial foxtail. It is native to the Americas and can be found throughout Tennessee in hay fields, pastures, lawns, roadsides and waste sites.
  • Spiny Amaranth, W353 – Spiny amaranth, also known as hogweed, spiny pigweed, spiny carelessweed, or stickerweed, is an erect summer annual that is a member of the pigweed family. Spiny amaranth is a native to tropical America and can be found throughout Tennessee.
  • Buckhorn Plantain, W322 – Buckhorn plantain, also known as English plantain, narrow-leaved plantain, and ribwort plantain, is an erect cool-season perennial plant that is a member of the plantain family .
  • Buttercups, W323 – Several species of buttercup are found in Tennessee. Two of the most common are hairy buttercup and bulbous buttercup. They are not native to the United States and are members of the but-tercup family¬†(Ranunculaceae).
  • Chinese Privot, W324 – Chinese privet, also called privet, privet hedge, and hedge bush, is a woody, very invasive shrub native to China. It was introduced into the United States in the early to mid-1800s as an ornamental plant; it later escaped from cultivation and has naturalized throughout the southeastern United States.
  • Weed Management in Pasture and Hay Crops, PB1801 – Regardless what kind of pasture most annual and perennial broadleaf weeds reduce forage yield, palatability, and quality in pastures and hay crops.
  • Pasture Weed Stewardship, W265 – Troublesome annual and perennial broadleaf weeds must be managed to optimize pasture quality and productivity. In most cases, broadleaf herbicides are necessary ingredients in a pasture weed management program.
  • Weed Control Manual for Tennessee, PB1580 – This manual contains the weed control recommendations for corn, grain, sorghum, cotton, soybeans, burley and dark tobacco, wheat, forage crops, switchgrass and farm ponds.
  • Herbicide Classification Poster – This chart groups herbicides by their modes of action to assist you in selecting herbicides 1)to maintain greater diversity in herbicide use and 2)to rotate among effective herbicides with different sites of action to delay the development of herbicide resistance.
  • Take Action (Pesticide Resistance Management) – National and state-specific weed management resources from university Extension weed scientists and researcher.
  • Herbicide Classification Poster – This chart groups herbicides by their modes of action to assist you in selecting herbicides 1) to maintain greater diversity in herbicide use and 2) to rotate among effective herbicides with different sites of action to delay the development of herbicide resistance.
  • Tennessee Weed Identification Guide

Publications on Preventing Off-target Herbicide Problems

  • Preventing Off-target Herbicide Problems in Tobacco Fields, W290-A – A major issue in tobacco production is off-target movement of agricultural chemicals, particularly pasture and right-of-way herbicides. Although highly effective on several broadleaf weeds in pastures and rights-of-way, the auxin or growth regulator herbicides can damage sensitive crops if not used properly.
  • Preventing Off-target Herbicide Problems in Cotton Fields, W291-A – Off-target movement of agricultural chemicals, including pasture and right-of-way herbicides, can be detrimental to cotton production. While these herbicides are valuable tools for weed management, off-target damage to cotton often results in expensive fines and/or lawsuits, delayed harvests, reduced yields, and bad publicity for the industry. Fortunately, preventive steps can be taken to avoid these problems.
  • Preventing Off-target Herbicide Problems in Tomato Fields, W295-A – Agricultural chemicals, particularly pasture and right-of-way herbicides, have the potential to cause off-target damage to tomatoes. Although these herbicides control many troublesome weeds, off-target damage to tomatoes often results in expensive fines and/or lawsuits, lost productivity for growers, and even crop rejection. Several management practices can be adopted to avoid these problems.
  • Preventing Off-target Herbicide Problems in Vineyards, W297-A – Grape production is an increasingly important component of agriculture in Tennessee and many parts of the United States. Since many vineyards are located near pastures, hay fields or roads, off-target movement of pasture and right-of-way herbicides is becoming a major issue in grape production.

Publications on Diagnosing Off-target Herbicide Damage

  • Diagnosing Suspected Herbicide Damage in Tobacco, W290-B – A major issue in tobacco production is off-target movement of agricultural chemicals, particularly pasture and right-of-way herbicides. Images and descriptions in this publication are intended to highlight characteristic symptomology of each of these broadleaf herbicides on tobacco.
  • Diagnosing Suspected Herbicide Damage in Cotton, W291-B – Off-target movement of agricultural chemicals, including pasture and right-of-way herbicides, can be detrimental to cotton production. Images and descriptions in this publication are intended to highlight characteristic symptomology of each of these broadleaf herbicides on cotton.
  • Diagnosing Suspected Herbicide Damage to Tomato, W295-B – Pasture and right-of-way herbicides have the potential to move off-target and can severely impact tomato production. Images and descriptions in this publication are intended to highlight characteristic symptomology of each of these broadleaf herbicides on tomatoes.
  • Diagnosing Suspected Herbicide Damage to Grape, W297-B – Pasture and right-of-way herbicides have the potential to move off-target and can severely impact grape production. Images and descriptions in this publication are intended to highlight characteristic symptomology of each of these broadleaf herbicides on grape.

Videos on Herbicide Stewardship

The links below will open the video in YouTube.